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NASH THE SLASH

"The second in our series of forgotten, lost or just plainly missed classic albums; Nash The Slash's 'And You Thought You Were Normal'."

 

 
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‘And You Thought You Were Normal' by Nash The Slash

Released in 1982 by PVC

 

Tracklisting:
1 - Citizen
2 - Pretty Folks
3 - RSVP
4 - Vincent's Crow
5 - Dance After Curfew
6 - Normal
7 - The Hypnotist
8 - Remember When
9 - Animal Jamboree
10 - Stalker

 

This is Nash's most accessible album, although admittedly that's not saying much. For one thing, he sings on this one.
Imagine a blend of Tubeway Army, Pink Floyd (Barrett era), Jean-Michel Jarre, The Stranglers and That One Guy and you get a small sense of the Nash The Slash's music. Add the mystery of a zealously guarded identity (he's believed to be Canadian) and someone who appears onstage with his face swathed completely in surgical bandages, and you have a clearer picture of one of music industries true eccentrics. Who else released an instrumental LP that bills itself as playable at any speed?
Nash first surfaced in 1976 as an electric violinist and mandolin player with vocalist, bassist and synthesizer player Cameron Hawkins as FM, before embarking on his bizarre solo career.
He came to prominence to the UK and me, when he supported Gary Numan on his farewell tour and played on his ‘Dance' album in 1981. That prompted me to pick up ‘And You Thought You Were Normal' for a quid in a 2nd hand record shop. I was instantly hooked and like the fact that none of my mates had heard of him at that time or had heard the album.
Nash wrote the music and played all the instruments, even handling the engineering and production at times during his first several albums, until ‘And You Thought You Were Normal', which saw Daniel Lanois producing ‘Dance After Curfew' which was actually released as a single.
The opening track, Citizen, has a great beat and is almost danceable.
And that's what stands out on this album for me, is that kids today would really get off on this album. Although I wouldn't say it was a timeless album, the time is right now to discover it.
There are atmospheric and spooky moments in the middle of the album with ‘Normal' or ‘The Hypnotist' before finishing off with the crazy ‘Animal Jamboree' and the menacing ‘Stalker'.
I won't say, "give it a go" with ‘And You Thought You Were Normal'. I'd like it if you did but I'd also like it, if the pleasure was still all mine!

 

It was re-released in 2000 on CD with bonus tracks.

 

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